Coaching around the Focus of Awareness: Where and What Works

Coaching around the Focus of Awareness: Where and What Works

“The difference between stumbling blocks and stepping stones is how you use them.” ~ Anonymous

Premise

As clients gain greater awareness of themselves and their world, viagra 60mg expand their choices for effective action, vcialis 40mg and develop their self trust so that they move forward on their intention; they start to take more effective actions that lead them towards their goals.

In this September series of blog posts, we are going to focus on Coaching around the Focus for Awareness: Who, What, Where, What Works.

Last week, we focused on Coaching Awareness of WHAT you want: Setting meaningful goals. This week we focus on Coaching Awareness of WHERE you are: Current Reality relative to Goal; and Awareness of WHAT WORKS and what doesn’t work: Supports and Interference

Coaching Awareness of WHERE you are: Current Reality relative to Goal

“And the day came when the risk to remain tight in a bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom.” ~Anais Nin

As clients set goals, it is important they get clear on their current reality – on where they are now relative to where they want to be. This requires a thorough look at the current state of affairs without any blinders on. It sometimes requires the willingness to look at some unpleasant truths. As coaches, asking powerful, probing questions without judgment and attachment can be very empowering for the client. Encouraging systematic client observation – of self, others, and processes – and debriefing with them to leverage the learning is very important. Introducing clients to tools that allow them to stand back and review the bigger context of the situation is also very helpful.

Coaching Awareness of WHAT WORKS and What Doesn’t: Supports and Interference

“The difference between stumbling blocks and stepping stones is how you use them.” ~Anonymous

External Support

As clients become more aware of their personal strengths and gifts, their sense of their own internal resourcefulness will grow. It is also important, though, to remind clients to consider what external resources (time management systems, etc.) and support (other people, etc.) they have available to them. For many clients it is a shift to consider the possibility of putting in place external support.

As clients commit to next steps, ask them what support they would want or need around that. As the coach you may have some good ideas about support structures. The first place to look for wisdom, though, is in the client. Client-generated solutions have a better chance of working for the client. Remember that the overall goal is to develop clients’ future resourcefulness. This includes learning to figure out what kind of support is wanted and needed around specific challenges, and how to find that support in their lives.

What Gets in the Way: Dealing with Obstacles

Coaching can support clients in drawing on their creativity in handling obstacles, instead of giving up too easily.

As clients start moving towards their desired outcomes, a variety of factors could negatively impact their progress. To enhance clients’ mobility towards their goals, they need to understand what is getting in the way. By reflecting on their actual experiences as they start taking action, clients will become aware of what gets in their way and what they need to change to deal with the obstacles.

In some cases the client may discover that the cost of dealing with the obstacles outweighs the benefits to be gained from achieving the goal. Then, the client may want to consider whether it is appropriate to change the goal.

Obstacles can be either internal or external.

External obstacles will depend to a large extent on the nature of the goal.

Internal obstacles are usually the most challenging ones to deal with. Some of the common ones to consider are:

  • Unproductive habits and attitudes
  • Lack of skills
  • Lack of self-confidence

As the coach, work with the client to see clearly what the nature of the obstacle is. And then co-create a plan with the client to overcome or avoid the obstacle. For instance:

  • If it is a lack of skill does the client need to acquire the skill or is it something that can be hired? If the client needs to acquire it, what’s an effective plan to do so?
  • If the obstacle is a habit, what would be a more productive new habit to put in place to replace the old habit?
  • If the obstacle is an attitude or mindset, what would be a more productive mindset? How can the client shift towards such a mindset?

Reflective Questions: As a coach, how do you hold the creative tension between the client’s current reality and their desired future, across time and despite challenges? Since the greatest threat to a client’s potential generally comes from within, how do you work with a client to enhance their self-trust? What have you learned from your own experience of moving past challenges toward important goals that helps you to support clients on their own change journey? How might your own experience and beliefs about change color your understanding of the client’s path?

This concludes our September series on Coaching around the Focus for Awareness: Who, What, Where, What Works. We hope you enjoyed it.

Have Questions or Want to Learn More? Contact us today! 

Comments are closed.